Transmission Essays French Literature Thought Cinema

Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Summer
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 13120

This course helps students gain intermediate skills in spoken and written Portuguese quickly by building on their prior knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to make very quick progress and to develop their abilities for further study at the advanced level or for professional purposes.

All enrolled students will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

This course provides 140 contact hours and participants may be eligible to receive a FLAS grant from their home institution or from UChicago to support their study. The SLI accepts the FLAS award as full tuition for summer Portuguese. PQ: At least one year of recent college-level study of Spanish, French, or Italian.

Advanced Portuguese

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 20200

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through exposure to written and oral documents (e.g., literary texts, interviews). Students are taught the grammatical and lexical tools necessary to understand these documents, as well as to produce their own analysis and commentaries.

Anthropologie, littérature et société : perspectives françaises et francophones.

Bastien Craipain

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 22217

Du naturalisme de Zola (France) à la littérature-monde de Mabanckou (Congo), en passant par l’exotisme de Segalen (France) ou la négritude de Senghor (Sénégal), la littérature de langue française est pleine de ces œuvres inspirées, voire imprégnées, de savoirs anthropologiques. Mais l’inverse est aussi vrai puisque, dès la fin du XIXe siècle, il n’est pas rare de voir les anthropologues s’intéresser à l’écriture littéraire comme moyen d’exploration, de découverte et d’exposition de problématiques propres aux sciences sociales. Ce cours d’introduction se propose d’aborder, à travers un nombre réduit de textes fondateurs (Rousseau, Gobineau, Firmin, Césaire, Lévi-Strauss, etc.), certaines des grandes questions sociopolitiques et culturelles (race, culture, nation, religion, etc.) qui ont poussé les écrivains et savants, aux XIXe et XXe siècles, à dépasser les barrières institutionnelles de leurs disciplines respectives. Il s’agira grâce à cette approche interdisciplinaire de comprendre comment la pensée des uns a pu permettre de réinventer la pratique des autres, et vice versa. Taught in French. PQ: FREN 20500.

BA Paper Preparation: French

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. PQ: Consent of undergraduate adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

BA Paper Preparation: Italian

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. PQ: Consent of undergraduate adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

BA Paper Preparation: Spanish

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. PQ: Consent of undergraduate adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Baudelaire

Rosanna Warren

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 27701
FNDL 27701

An in-depth study of Baudelaire’s works. We will read (in English translation) Les Fleurs du mal, Les Petits poèmes en prose, and selections from his art criticism, in order to develop a perspective on this great poet who was both classical and romantic, both a traditional and a revolutionary artist who helped create modernism. Taught in English. Students taking the course for French credit will do readings in French and participate in a weekly French discussion section.

Beginning Elementary French I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary French II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 10200

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100. PQ: FREN 10100 or placement.

Beginning Elementary French III

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 10300

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language. PQ: FREN 10200 or placement.

Beginning Elementary Italian I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Italian II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 10200

This course offer a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in ITAL 10100. PQ: ITAL 10100 or placement.

Beginning Elementary Italian III

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 10300

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages. PQ: ITAL 10200 or placement.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Portuguese and for students who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 10200

This course is a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in PORT 10100.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese III

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 10300

This course expands on the material presented in PORT 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Spanish I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Spanish II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 10200

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100. PQ: SPAN 10100 or placement.

Beginning Elementary Spanish III

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 10300

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination. PQ: SPAN 10200 or placement.

Blinding Enlightenment

Robert Morrissey

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 21820

The French Enlightenment marks a blinding explosion of moral, philosophical and artistic creativity. The dynamics of self and other are explored as vehicles for critical thought as well as a playful, even ironic understanding of a modern self that is being defined and constructed in and through many of the works that we will read for this course. The dialectics of passion and reason are examined in this unfurling of a newly self-conscious modernity. This introductory-level course will examine some of the great works of the French Enlightenment in their specific relation to the world we have become. Works by Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot and Rousseau as well as Marivaux and Beaumarchais; genres: theatre, novels, philosophical dialogues and tales. Discussion and readings and writing in French. PQ: FREN 20500.

Català avançat: Llengua, societat i cultura

Alba Girons Mason

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Catalan Literature
CATA 21100

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through the study of a wide variety of contemporary texts and audiovisual materials. It will provide students with a better understanding of contemporary Catalan society. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates. PQ: CATA 11200, CATA 12300 or consent of instructor.

Catalan Culture and Society: Art, music and cinema

Alba Girons Mason

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Catalan Literature
CATA 21600
SPAN 21610

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standarization of Catalan. The course will be conducted in English and/or Catalan, depending on the students' command of the language.

Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I

Alba Girons Mason

Level: Undergrad

2017-18
Catalan Language
CATA 12200

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages II

Alba Girons Mason

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Catalan Language
CATA 12300

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages. This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in CATA 12200. PQ: CATA 11100, CATA 12200 or consent of instructor.

Catalan Multipart Singing in Modern and Contemporary History: from Religious Brotherhoods to Taverns and Choir Societies

Jaume Ayats

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
Spanish, Catalan Literature
CATA 27917/37917
SPAN 27917/37917, MUSI 27918/37918

To sing together “a veus” (Multipart) has historically been an experiential way to build social groups. The aim of this course is to present this activity across Catalonia from the XVIth century until XXIst century, paying special attention to how Multipart Singing has articulated a large part of association and shared community life since the middle XIXth century. The Catalan example will be placed among Multipart Singing in Mediterranean Latin countries, where the phenomenon is shared with great intensity. PQ: Reading knowledge of Arabic, Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish. For music undergrads: MUS 23300.

Cervantes in the Americas

Medardo Rosario

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 28017
LACS 28017

Miguel de Cervantes continues to be a literary referent for some of the most important authors in the Americas. Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, Roberto Bolaño and Jorge Volpi are among those who have reflected on Cervantes’ literary works. In this course we will examine some of the most representative examples of the transatlantic dialog that emerged from the appropriation of Cervantes’ Don Quixote as inspiration for the production of literary texts in the Americas. Each text will be paired with a section of Don Quixote in order to establish a transatlantic dialog that aims to explore how certain cultural materials are re-appropriated and re-contextualized to produce new manifestations of art. Taught in Spanish.

Cervantes' Novelas ejemplares & the mysteries of narrative

Frederick de Armas

Level: Grad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 34200

This course will re-assess Cervantes’ Novelas ejemplares. The course will take as a point of departure two statements made in the Prologue to the collection: that this was the first such collection in Spanish; and that it contains hidden mysteries. Thus, we will study the Novelas in the context of the Italian novelle by Boccaccio and Bandello to assess their originality. And we will look for the mysteries in narrative through ekphrasis, onomastics, disruptions in chronology, the doubling of a historical present, the subversion of the romance mode and the geographical amplitude of the tales. The course will conclude with a look at later Spanish novelas in order to gain further insight as to Cervantes’ innovative techniques. Taught in Spanish.

Challenges of Translation: Italian Poetry and Prose

Silvia Guslandi

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 23217

The course focuses on the analysis and production of translations of Italian literary texts. We will compare different English translations of classics of Italian literature, such as Dante’s Inferno, Boccaccio’s Decameron and Petrarch’s Canzoniere. We will analyze translations of modern poetry and prose, by authors such as Montale, Calvino and Pasolini and discuss the effectiveness of Ann Goldstein’s recent translations of Elena Ferrante’s tetralogy and their role in securing the author’s success abroad. Students will also be faced with the challenges of allegedly untranslatable texts, such as those produced by Futurism. The course will shed light on the ways in which translations shape our reading of the Italian literary tradition and on the strategies involved in transporting literary artifacts across cultures. Students will be encouraged to produce their own translations and provide feedback on each other’s texts in a workshop setting. PQ: Only a very basic knowledge of Italian is required.

This counts towards the Italian Major/Minor.

Classicism and Romanticism

Larry Norman

Level: Both
Winter
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 26220/36220

This undergraduate/graduate course will examine the dynamic relationship between the French “Classicism” of the Age of Louis XIV and the later post-Revolutionary movement of Romanticism. We will pair readings of poetic, dramatic, and narrative works from the 17th-century (e.g., Molière, Mme de La Fayette, Corneille, Racine) with later counterparts (Germaine de Staël, Chateaubriand, Stendhal, Hugo, George Sand), probing changing conceptions of the role of literature and art, as well as shifting attitudes towards erotic love, social norms, and nature. Course taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 205 and one introductory-level literature course taught in French.

Composición y conversación avanzada I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 20400

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Composición y conversación avanzada II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter, Spring
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 20500

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. PQ: SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor.

Contemporary Catalan Literature

Alba Girons Mason

Level: Both
Winter
2017-18
Catalan Literature
CATA 21900/31900
SPAN 21910/31910

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Corso di perfezionamento

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 20400

This course helps students achieve a very high level of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. Using a variety of literary and nonliterary texts as models, students examine the linguistic structure and organization of several types of written Italian discourse. This course is also intended to help students attain high levels in reading, speaking, and listening through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Italian society. PQ: ITAL 20300, placement, or consent.

Curso de Aperfeiçoamento

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 21500

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding, summarizing, and producing written and spoken arguments in Portuguese through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Luso-Brazilian societies. Special consideration is given to the major differences between continental and Brazilian Portuguese. In addition to reading, analyzing, and commenting on advanced texts (both literary and nonliterary), students practice and extend their writing skills in a series of compositions. PQ: PORT 20200 or consent.

Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 20402

This advanced language course helps students achieve mastery of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. A wide variety of literary, historiographic, and sociological texts are read. Through writing a number of essays and participating in class debates, students are guided in the examination of linguistic structures and organization of several types of written Spanish discourse. This course also enhances awareness of the cultural diversity within the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its historical roots. PQ: SPAN 20300 or placement. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

Discurso académico para hablantes nativos

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Spanish Language
SPAN 20602

This seminar/practicum focuses on developing vocabulary and discourse styles for academic verbal communication. This goal is achieved through exposure to taped formal and informal interviews and public debate in the media. Most important, however, is active class participation. Through a number of class presentations, students put into practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). We also read numerous Spanish newspapers. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent. Open only to native speakers.

Ecrire en français

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 20500

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French are required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French. PQ: FREN 20300 or placement.

Égalité des races dans la francophonie

Daniel Desormeaux

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 27100/37100
CRES 27100

La réflexion anthropologie sur la Caraïbe commence avec les premières explorations européennes au cours des 15e et 16e siècles. Tout comme lors du développement de la colonisation, puis du système esclavagiste inauguré par le Code Noir (1685), la question raciale s’instaure au cœur même de la revendication républicaine des esclaves et de l’indépendance haïtienne. C’est cependant au milieu du 19e siècle, période où triomphe l’anthropologie positive, que paraîtront deux ouvrages majeurs sur la question raciale: De l’inégalité des races (1853) de Gobineau et De l’égalité des races humaines (1885) d’Anténor Firmin, l’un des premiers noirs à être membre de la Société d’anthropologie de Paris. Le séminaire analysera ces deux ouvrages en rapport avec l’esprit et l’histoire des idées de l’époque en mettant en évidence, à travers les réflexions théoriques et les œuvres des Durkheim, Firmin, Gobineau, Hibbert, Joseph-Janvier, Madiou, Marcelin, Moreau de Saint-Méry, Renan, Saint-Rémy, Schœlcher, l’émergence croisée et progressive d’un formidable discours sur la race dans l’histoire, la littérature et la philosophie politique, tout au long de la deuxième moitié du 19e siècle. Taught in French. PQ: Undergrads must be in their third or fourth year.

Cross listed with CRES 37110

Embodiment and Identity in the Literatures of the Hispanic Caribbean

Ebenezer Concepción

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
GNSE 23115
SPAN 23155, LACS 23115

In this course, we will examine processes of embodiment and the formation of identities in the 20th- and 21st-century literary production of Cuba, Santo Domingo, and Puerto Rico, and their diasporas in the United States through aesthetic and conceptual frameworks. We will consider the following questions: How does the literature of the regions in question portray bodies in relation with the self, other bodies, and the spaces they inhabit? How does this correlate to the formations of the self and identity? More specifically, how does gender, sexual, and racial/ethnic difference inform the constitution and practices of the body in public and private settings and in relation with the nation-state? We will primarily analyze texts from various genres in their own narrative construction, their sociohistorical placement, and in dialogue with other media, such as film and visual art. Authors studied include: Rosario Ferré, Junot Díaz, Luis Negrón, Achy Obejas, Reinaldo Arenas, Rita Indiana, et al. Taught in English. Students majoring or minoring in Spanish will be asked to read and/or write in the Romance language.

Empire, Slavery, Salvation: Writing Difference in the Colonial Americas

Larissa Brewer-García

Level: Grad
Spring
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 38810
LACS 38810

This course explores portrayals of human difference in literature, travel writing, painting, and autobiography from Spain, England, and the Americas. Students will become versed in debates surrounding the emergence of human distinctions based on religion, race, and ethnicity in the early modern era. Understanding these debates and the history surrounding them is crucial to participating in informed discussion, research, and activism regarding issues of race, empire, and colonialism across time and space. Taught in Spanish.

Espacio y memoria en el cine español

Mario Santana

Level: Both
Autumn
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29220/39220

Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries, this course will provide a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention the relation between the representation of space and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture. Taught in Spanish. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Exploratory Translation

Jennifer Scappettone & Haun Saussy

Level: Grad
Winter
2017-18
RLLT Literature
RLLT 42918
CDIN 42918, CMLT 42918, ENGL 42918, SCTH 42918

Focusing on the theory, history and practice of poetic translation, this seminar includes sessions with invited theorists and practitioners from North and South America, Europe, and Asia. Taking translation to be an art of making sense that is transmitted together with a craft of shapes and sequences, we aim to account for social and intellectual pressures influencing translation projects. We deliberately foreground other frameworks beyond “foreign to English” and “olden epochs to modern”—and other methods than the “equivalence of meaning”—in order to aim at a truly general history and theory of translation that might both guide comparative cultural history and enlarge the imaginative resources of translators and readers of translation. In addition to reading and analysis of outside texts spanning such topics as semantic and grammatical interference, gain and loss, bilingualism, self-translation, pidgin, code-switching, translationese, and foreignization vs. nativization, students will be invited to try their hands at a range of tactics, aiming toward a final portfolio of annotated translations.

Expression orale et phonétique

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 20601

This course focuses on developing the tools necessary for advanced oral proficiency in an academic context. Through active class participation involving a number of class presentations, students practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). Special emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation. This course does not count toward major or minor requirements.

Foreign Language Acquisition, Research and Teaching

Janet Sedlar

Level: Grad
Autumn
2017-18
RLLT Literature
RLLT 38800

This course provides students with a foundation in foreign language acquisition and sociolinguistic research pertinent to foreign language teaching and introduces current teaching methodologies and technologies and their usefulness in the classroom. PQ: Open only to RLL students or with instructor consent.

French Language, History, and Culture I

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 20100

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society. PQ: FREN 10300 or placement.

French Language, History, and Culture II

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 20200

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities. PQ: FREN 20100 or placement.

French Language, History, and Culture III

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2017-18
French Language
FREN 20300

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society. PQ: FREN 20200 or placement.

French-language African Literature in Translation

Fidèle Mpiranya

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
26618/36618
FREN

This course presents an overview of African literature of French expression, focusing on both the text and the context; in particular, on how the African traditions and/or the socio-cultural environment influence the literary creation. It reviews major trends of this literature, from the pre-World War II assimilationist period to the contemporary creations in Africa and France. Additionally, individual creations representative of different periods are reviewed in detail in class or for a final paper produced by the students. In the end, the students will be able to characterize the different trends of African literature of French expression and illustrate them with specific oeuvres. PQ: Taught in English. Students seeking French credit must do the writings and/or read French texts in that language.

From Baroque to Neo-Baroque

Miguel Martínez & Rachel Galvin

Level: Grad
Autumn
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 40017
CDIN 40000, ENGL 63400, CMLT 40000

We will take a transatlantic and hemispheric approach to examining the political, epistemological, and aesthetic dimensions of the concept of the Baroque, by reading European and Latin American theory and poetry from three centuries (17th, 20th, 21st). The course is purposefully designed to put modern and early modern texts in constant dialogue. The literary essays of 20th-c. Latin American writers such as Lezama Lima and Alfonso Reyes, for instance, will illuminate the 17th-c. poems of Góngora and Sor Juana, while these will be read in conjunction with those of José Kozer, Luis Felipe Fabre, and Tamara Kamenszain. The remarkable persistence of the Baroque across centuries, geographies, and cultures raises a number of questions. Why has the Baroque not gone out of fashion, but rather, been reborn again and again? How does this apparently recondite mode manage to remain politically relevant and articulate urgent ideas in its moment? How does the Baroque provide poets with a prism through which to explore questions of subjectivity, originality, and capital? How does the Baroque contribute to or complicate notions of intertextuality? How does a Baroque aesthetic theorize accumulation and waste in developing capitalist and late capitalist societies? How does the connection between the neo-Baroque and antropofagia, the Brazilian notion of cultural cannibalism, play out in poems not only written in Brazil, but also throughout Latin America and in the US? PQ: Spanish encouraged but not required.

Guillotine/Barricade: Figures of History Across Media

Jennifer Wild & James Cahill

Level: Grad
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 43501
CDIN 53500, CMST 53500

Taking up the French historical technologies of the guillotine and the barricade, this doctoral seminar explores the history of political spectacle, violence, death, and resistance as also part of a history of figuration—conceptualized by Julia Kristeva as the establishment of a relation between two historical realities—across media. We will examine the actual materials and practices of the guillotine and the barricade alongside literary, artistic, and filmic works that deploy the figural logic of both technologies as part of their formal, representational, and/or political articulation. This seminar thus seeks to examine the methodological stakes of inter-medial and interdisciplinary history and historiography that draws equally from French history, literature, visual art (including sculpture), architecture, and film. While our sessions, including film screenings, will at times be devoted to understanding the function of the guillotine and the barricade in French history, others will demand a more abstract conceptualization of these forms and technologies. We ask what history and praxis of visual culture derives from the guillotine as a tendentious “image,” and of the barricade as a figure for both concealment and opening—a form that resists semiotic unity used in urban resistance? How do both figures suggest something of their value and development at various revolutionary moments that extend the political into the realm of signification, art and aesthetics? How do we reconcile these figures in a history of architectural or built form, and how do we situate them within contemporary debates on resistance, the death penalty, and extremist violence? This class will be taught in English; French reading and research skills are not necessary, but would be beneficial.

Henri Focillon’s “Formalism”

Aden Kumler

Level: Grad
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 46551
ARTH 46550

Henri Focillon (1881-1943) advanced an account of form that influenced work in many fields and provoked vehement critique. This seminar takes up Focillon’s thought with a critical eye: immersing ourselves in his writings, we will seek to understand their intellectual debts and contributions and we will also take up the question: what might Focillon still teach us about perennially vexed historical questions of form, style, influence, perception and creativity? Historiographically framed, the seminar will nonetheless seek to attend closely to the works of art and architecture that interested Focillon from his early writings while director of the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Lyon, through his attainment of the Chair of Archeology at the Sorbonne, his election to the Collège de France, and during his time in the United States, before and during World War II. PQ: Many readings will be in French (much of Focillon’s writing has not yet been translated); students who cannot read French should contact Prof. Kumler in advance to discuss how appropriate accommodations might be made.

Histoire du théâtre français de la Renaissance aux Lumières (XVIe – XVIIIe siècle)

Julien Perrier-Chartrand

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 26217/36217
TAPS 26217/36217

Entre le XVIe et le XVIIIe siècle, le théâtre français connaît une période de remarquable effervescence. La tragédie renaît avec la Cléopâtre captive d’Étienne Jodelle (1553), la pastorale et la tragi-comédie connaissent une popularité sans précédent, la comédie est à jamais transformée par la représentation de L’école des femmes (1663), le théâtre lyrique et l’opéra-comique acquièrent leurs spécificités respectives et le drame bourgeois rencontre ses premiers succès. Ce cours d’Histoire du théâtre français de la Renaissance aux Lumières se propose d’examiner la poétique de chacun de ces genres dans le contexte des grands courants esthétiques de l’époque (humanisme, baroque et classicisme). Tout en soulignant que les pièces produites durant les trois siècles étudiés sont encore tributaires des sources antiques et médiévales, ce panorama montrera de quelle façon le génie de certains auteurs – ainsi que les querelles que suscite l’opposition morale et intellectuelle à l’art dramatique – contribue au développement d’un des spectacles les plus brillants et les plus acclamés d’Europe. Taught in French.

Intermediate Portuguese

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Portuguese Language
PORT 20100

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of Luso-Brazilian tradition through a variety of texts.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos

Frederick de Armas

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21703

En este curso estudiamos algunas de las obras más importantes de las tres primeras épocas de la literatura española: época medieval, Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro (modernidad temprana). Analizamos también diferentes géneros literarios como el cuento, la novela corta, la poesía y el teatro. Nos dedicamos al estudio de la narrativa comenzando con ejemplos de don Juan Manuel, y continuando con las Novelas ejemplares de Cervantes. Nos dedicamos a analizar la poesía de Fray Luis de León y sonetos de otros grandes poetas. También estudiamos el teatro, incluyendo una comedia de Lope de Vega. Entre los tópicos más importantes del curso se encuentran: la realidad y la imaginación; las ventajas y desventajas de la imaginación; la importancia de la magia y la astrología; el gobierno de un reino; los buenos y malos consejeros; la guerra y la salvación; los ideales renacentistas; el tema del desengaño, el contraste entre el estilo llano y el culteranismo y conceptismo; el sentido de la ejemplaridad; y el papel de la mujer en la sociedad. Veremos además cómo en España vivían conjuntamente cristianos, judíos y moros, y cómo convivían. Taught in Spanish. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos

Miguel Martínez

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21803

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX y XX. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España. Taught in Spanish. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos del modernismo al presente

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 22003
LACS 22003

This course offers an introduction to modern Spanish American literature, from the late nineteenth century through the present moment. Drawing from essays, fiction, poetry, and film, the course focuses on the complex relations between literary production, aesthetics, and sociopolitical transformations. Among other topics, we will discuss how to approach literary texts and how to interpret them. How does literature signify? How does it work? What does it say about history, politics, and society in Spanish America? How do literary fictions relate to other cultural forms such as photography and film? Taught in Spanish. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia

Jorge Lefevre

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21903

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

Introducción al análisis literario

Mario Santana

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21500

Through a variety of representative works of Hispanic literature, this course focuses on the discussion and practical application of different approaches to the critical reading of literary texts. We also study basic concepts and problems of literary theory, as well as strategies for research and academic writing in Spanish. Taught in Spanish. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Introduction à la littérature française III: Littérature du 19e

Daniel Desormeaux

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 21903

An introduction to some major nineteenth-century French literary works, this course emphasizes the main cultural debates of the period through some close readings and discussions. We study various literary genres from early Romanticism to the rise of Symbolism. Authors include Chateaubriand, Mme de Staël, Benjamin Constant, Balzac, George Sand, Hugo, Musset, Zola, Lamartine, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, and Mallarmé. Taught in French. PQ: FREN 20500 or consent of instructor.

Italian Comic Theatre

Rocco Rubini

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 28702/38702
TAPS 28702/38702

A survey of the history of Italian theater from the Erudite Renaissance Comedy to Goldoni’s reform. We will pay particular attention to the tradition of commedia dell’arte (scenarios, stock characters, and plot formation), ancient and medieval influences, evolution and emancipation of female characters, and the question of language. Readings include works by Plautus, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Angelo Beolco (Ruzante), Flaminio Scala, and Goldoni. Toward the end of the course we will consider the legacy of Italian Comedy in relation to the birth of grotesque and realist drama in Pirandello.

Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 12200

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages. PQ: 20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor.

Italian Language, History, and Culture I

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 20100

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Italian-speaking world through the reading of excerpts from contemporary Italian literature. PQ: ITAL 10300 or placement.

Italian Language, History, and Culture II

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 20200

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Italian-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items. Cultural awareness is enhanced through close study of contemporary Italian film and literature, as well as through in-class discussion. PQ: ITAL 20100 or placement.

Italian Language, History, and Culture III

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
Italian Language
ITAL 20300

This course completes the study of the common grammatical functions and syntactical structures of the oral and written language and introduces students to description and analysis of a variety of texts through written, oral, listening, and reading activities. Students read a contemporary Italian novel and a selection of Italian poetry. PQ: ITAL 20200 or placement.

Italo Calvino: the Dark Side

Maria Anna Mariani

Level: Both
Winter
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 21820/31820
FNDL 21820

An intense reading of Italo Calvino’s later works: we will contemplate the orbital debris of Cosmicomics and t zero, and we will follow the labyrinthine threads of The Castle of Crossed Destinies and The Invisible Cities. After stumbling upon the suspended multiple beginnings of If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler, we will probe the possibilities of literature with the essays collected in Una pietra sopra. Finally, we will encounter Mr Palomar, who will provide us with a set of instructions on how to neutralize the self and "learn how to be dead.” The approach will be both philosophical and historical, focusing on Calvino’s ambiguous fascination with science, his critique of the aporias of reason and the “dementia” of the intellectual, and his engagement with the nuclear threat of total annihilation. Taught in Italian.

Las regiones del español

Staff

Level: Undergrad

2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21100
LACS 21100

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions. PQ: Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

Le regioni italiane: lingua, dialetti, tradizioni

Staff

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 21100

This course expands students' awareness of the diversity of the Italian language and culture. It emphasizes the interrelationship between language and culture, as well as social and historical transformations. We also study the Italian phonological system. Students are exposed to a wide variety of texts, both literary and nonliterary, as well as audio-visual materials that enhance their awareness of regional expressions and Italian dialects. Guest lecturers include native speakers from different Italian regions.

Le Roman de la rose

Daisy Delogu

Level: Both
Autumn
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 21700/31700
GNSE 27300, FNDL 21700

The mid-thirteenth-century Roman de la Rose was arguably the single most influential vernacular text of the (French) Middle Ages. A sprawling, encyclopedic summa composed by two separate authors writing some forty years apart, whether taken as a source of inspiration or an object of condemnation, the Roman de la Rose became an obligatory point of reference for generations of authors. Over the course of quarter we will read the conjoined text, each student focusing their reading through a critical optic of their choice (e.g. gender studies, animal studies, ethics and philosophy, reception studies, manuscript studies, etc). Students will select and read ancillary texts to enrich their understanding of the Rose, and will collaborate with one another to chart a rich and diverse set of interpretive paths through this complex work. Taught in English, with readings in French. PQ: For undergrads, FREN 20500 and at least one other literature course taught in French.

Lengua, cultura y ciudadanía en la España contemporánea

Mario Santana

Level: Grad
Winter
2017-18
Spanish Literature
SPAN 33920
CATA 33920

Uno de los componentes fundamentales en la construcción de la España contemporánea (desde principios del siglo XIX hasta el presente) ha sido la “invención” de una cultura nacional a partir de un proceso selectivo de materiales preexistentes (lenguas, tradiciones, ideologías, mitos...) que facilitaran y legitimaran la transformación de los súbditos del Antiguo Régimen en ciudadanos de un estado. Este seminario estará dedicado a estudiar tanto la trayectoria histórica como los debates críticos actuales sobre el papel que han jugado en esa conceptualización moderna de la identidad colectiva las lenguas y literaturas ibéricas, y en particular su institucionalización y difusión a través de aparatos de transmisión ideológica y epistemológica (el sistema educativo o el paradigma epistemológico del “hispanismo”, por ejemplo). Taught in Spanish.

Les Revenants: fiction, histoire et société au 19e siècle

Daniel Desormeaux

Level: Both
Winter
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 28500/38500

Depuis belle lurette, la littérature fantastique est hantée de revenants et de fantômes, c’est-à-dire des êtres qui reviennent au bercail après une longue séparation, pour découvrir que tout a changé en leur absence et qu’ils n’ont plus de place. Dans le roman du XIXe siècle en France le personnage du revenant connaît un succès populaire phénoménal. Des figures quasi mythologiques comme Chabert, Vautrin, Jean Valjean, Rodolphe ou Monte-Cristo (évoluant symboliquement entre l’image triomphante d’Ulysse et celle d’un larron messianique) sont irrémédiablement ancrées dans l’imaginaire collectif. Mais presque tout revient dans ce siècle dit moderne: Histoire, préhistoire, mémoires, Révolutions, régimes politiques, Moyen-âge et anciens modes? Tout en explorant la fonction sociale et les fantasmes politiques que le thème du retour suscite dans l’univers romanesque, on tentera de déchiffrer la fonction complexe de la figure du revenant à travers l’axe anthropologique et historique. Les auteurs étudiés plus particulièrement seront Chateaubriand, Balzac, Dumas, Flaubert, Hugo, Goncourt, Nerval, Sand et Zola. Taught in French. PQ: Undergrads must be in their third or fourth year.

Literature and Technology: Machines, Humans, and the European Novel from Frankenstein to the Futurists

Ana Ilievska

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 28818

In his Scienza Nuova (New Science), Giambattista Vico writes that "the Egyptians reduced all preceding world time to three ages; namely, the age of gods, the age of heroes, and the age of men." What the Egyptians and Vico could not have predicted was that history had yet another age in store: the age of the machine. Carlyle baptized, Marx outlined it, Heidegger warned against it; Deleuze and Guattari proclaimed that "everything is a machine"; and Ted Kaczynski even went as far as to kill in order to free human beings from the "technological slavery" the machine age had purportedly brought about. And yet, as Heidegger wrote, "everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it." So what is technology? What impact did it have on human beings and on the writing of literature as the Industrial Revolution exploded onto the European continent? In this course we will pose anew the question concerning technology within the one field that Heidegger deemed akin to the essence of technology: art, and by deduction, literature. Together, we will trace the ecological, economical, and emotional footprints of various machines and technological devices (automata, trains, phonographs, cameras). We will delve into the topic with Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times, continue with a reflection on the human being as a machine (Frankenstein and Pinocchio), transition to accounts on cities, progress, and machines (Dickens, Zola, Eça de Queirós), and end with the Futurists' technological extravaganzas that will include a visit to Chicago's Art Institute. Other readings include texts by Marx, Raymond Williams, Heidegger, Leo Marx, Deleuze & Guattari, etc. This course will be taught in English. All materials are available in English, but reading in the original languages is encouraged.

Litterature et societe: Flaubert et Marx

Philippe Desan

Level: Both
Autumn
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 23610/33610
FNDL 23610

Our approach to Flaubert will be sociological. Three novels will be studied (Madame Bovary, Un cœur simple and L’Education sentimentale) in direct relation with texts from Marx, Althusser and other critics on alienation, merchandise, value theory, and the revolution of 1848 (Capital, Manuscripts of 1844, The German Ideology and 18 Brumaire de Louis Bonaparte). Taught in English, with Flaubert readings in French. Meets RLL French section grad theory requirement.

Marsilio Ficino's On Love

Armando Maggi

Level: Both
Winter
2017-18
Italian Literature
ITAL 23900/33900
CMLT 26701/36701, FNDL 21103, REMS 33900

This course is first of all a close reading of Marsilio Ficino’s seminal book On Love (first Latin edition De amore 1484; Ficino’s own Italian translation 1544). Ficino’s philosophical masterpiece is the foundation of the Renaissance view of love from a Neo-Platonic perspective. It is impossible to overemphasize its influence on European culture. On Love is not just a radically new interpretation of Plato’s Symposium. It is the book through which sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe read the love experience. Our course will analyze its multiple classical sources and its spiritual connotations. During our close reading of Ficino’s text, we will show how European writers and philosophers appropriated specific parts of this Renaissance masterpiece. In particular, we will read extensive excerpts from some important love treatises, such as Castiglione’s The Courtier (Il cortigiano), Leone Ebreo’s Dialogues on Love, Tullia d’Aragona’s On the Infinity of Love, but also selections from a variety of European poets, such as Michelangelo’s canzoniere, Maurice Scève’s Délie, and Fray Luis de León’s Poesía.

Merveilleux et vraisemblable : la réalité et ses contraires du moyen âge au XVIIe siècle

Esther Van Dyke

Level: Undergrad
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 23217

What if I told you that the real was imaginary and the imaginary was real? This course will explore the concepts of the marvelous, the imaginary and the real through a selection of French literature from the middle ages to the 17th century. The middle ages are often perceived as a rigid feudal society. Yet, fairies abound in stories, people shape-shift, and objects magically transform under our eyes. In the 16th century truth appears to harden through of advances in science, mathematics, and art. But simultaneously religious schisms, the discovery of the New World, and political anarchy shake the notion of the world’s stable limits to the core. The 17th century is known for Descartes’ rationalism and classical regularity. But even here there is the unexpected, the surprising je ne sais quoi and overwhelming ineffable. Through the literature of each era, we will see how reality often mixes with the marvelous, and everything is not always as it seems. Taught in French. PQ: FREN 20500.

Montaigne & La Boétie : une amitié littéraire

Philippe Desan

Level: Both
Spring
2017-18
French Literature
FREN 37620
FNDL 27620 FREN 27620

Nous retracerons le thème de l’amitié littéraire à partir de l’exemple de Montaigne et La Boétie. Nous étudierons ce topos à la Renaissance et nous placerons cette relation idéalisée dans son contexte politique et social. Un homme (La Boétie) et un texte (le Discours de la servitude volontaire) définissent l’amitié chez Montaigne. Les deux (individu et livre) sont indissociables et occupant une place centrale dans le livre de Montaigne. Nous lirons plusieurs chapitres des Essais de Montaigne, ainsi que le Discours de la servitude volontaire

I am a medievalist specialising in Occitan and French literature, and former Director of the University of Reading's Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies.

I am a former member of the international committee of the 'Association internationale d'études occitanes' (AIEO) www.aieo.org

My PhD was in the satirical tradition of troubadour poetry. My current research focuses on translation and adaptation of Latin didactic texts into the vernacular, as well as on word-and-image relations.   I have published on Old Occitan satirical and moralising verse, Old French lyric poetry (pastourelle and chansons de toile), and Middle French romance and didactic texts. My recent research has been on issues of multilingualism in French, Occitan and Catalan literature, as well as on the vernacular translation and adaptation of Latin didactic texts (e.g. Middle French versions of Valerius Maximus' Facta et dicta memorabilia). My current project, initially funded by the Leverhulme Trust (2011-13) is an edition of the Occitan version of a fourteenth-century universal history told largely through the medium of genealogies and images (British Library Egerton 1500), find out more by visiting the egerton 1500 blog

 

Postgraduate supervision
I have advised postgraduate research on medieval heresy in the Languedoc, tax records in Occitan-speaking regions, as well as on nineteenth-century Occitan writers.

Enquiries are welcome concerning postgraduate research in any of the following areas: word and image relations in poetry and didactic literature, multilingualism, hybridity, vernacular book cultures, translation, book culture, education, performance, vernacular readers, heresy and authority, adaptation (medieval and modern).

 

Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies

For details of Reading Medieval Studies click here:

Reading Medieval Studies

 WaysofWarCentre

 

Authored books

Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French Texts and Images: Translation and Adaptation (forthcoming)

 Multilingualism and Mother Tongue in medieval French, Occitan and Catalan narratives. Penn State University Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-271-03672-4. http://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-03672-4.html

Between Sequence and Sirventes: Aspects of Parody in the Troubadour Lyric (Society for French Studies/ European Humanities Research Board, ‘Legenda’, 2000)

Edited volumes

Edited with Rebecca Rist and Claire Taylor, The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade: A Sourcebook (London: Routledge, 2013), ISBN 978-1-40-825550-6

Edited with Stephen J. Milner, The Erotics of Consolation: Desire and Distance in the Middle Ages, New Middle Ages series (New York – Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan USA, 2008), viii+ 241 p. ISBN -13: 978-1-4039-7619-2

Authored chapter: ‘Maternal Consolatio in Antoine de La Sale’s Reconfort de Madame de Fresne’ (pp.185-203).

Edited with Marcus Bull, The World of Eleanor of Aquitaine: Literature and Society in Southern France in the eleventh and thirteenth centuries (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2005) (50% editorial work and co-authored introduction)

Edition

Simone de Beauvoir, Les Bouches inutiles: Edition with notes and introduction (Bristol Classical Press/ Duckworth, 2001)

 

BA Hons in French and Spanish (Cambridge, 1991), PhD (Cambridge, 1995).

I have held posts at the Ecole Normale Supérieure, rue d'Ulm, Paris (Maîtresse de langues, 1994-95), Queen's University, Belfast (1995-97) and the University of Bristol (1997-2007).

About French Studies at the School of Languages and European Studies

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