Cisco 2811 Port Assignments

Whether your networking lab has 3 devices or 30 an access server, also commonly called a terminal server, is the vital connection between you and those devices. For this purpose most engineers use routers with asynchronous serial ports to connect to console (serial) ports on other devices. There are a couple of ways this can be accomplished as these ports can be found on a few devices and line cards. One of the popular methods is to use older Cisco 2509/2511 routers with either asynchronous RJ45 ports, or a 68 pin SCSI II interface that uses a cable called a cab-octal, giving you 8 ports per interface. Another popular method seems to be the NM-32A network module which offers 32 async interfaces. See the following images for a depiction of each.

How does all of this work?

Our Cisco router assigns port numbers to each serial interface connected to it. We can use these to communicate directly with each line. For example, on the 16 port Cisco 2511, these port numbers are 2001 – 2016. We reference these on the router using a static host configuration. The IP address specified can either be an interface IP, or a loopback address. When using other hardware, such as the NM-32a, your port numbers may change depending on which slot you use on the router. One method of determining your port numbers is to issue a show line command on your access server. As you can see below, the lines may not always be 1-32, or 1-16. As shown below, this server uses lines 33-65, or port numbers 2033 through 2065.

AccessServer#show line Tty Typ Tx/Rx A Modem Roty AccO AccI Uses Noise Overruns Int * 0 CTY - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - 33 TTY 9600/9600 - - 1 - - 2 0 0/0 - 34 TTY 9600/9600 - - 2 - - 1 37 0/0 - 35 TTY 9600/9600 - - 3 - - 0 148 0/0 - 36 TTY 9600/9600 - - 4 - - 0 149 0/0 - 37 TTY 9600/9600 - - 5 - - 0 172 0/0 - 38 TTY 9600/9600 - - 6 - - 0 199 0/0 - < .... SNIP .... > 61 TTY 9600/9600 - - 29 - - 0 0 0/0 - 62 TTY 9600/9600 - - 30 - - 0 0 0/0 - 63 TTY 9600/9600 - - 31 - - 0 0 0/0 - 64 TTY 9600/9600 - - 32 - - 0 0 0/0 - 65 AUX 9600/9600 - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - 66 VTY - - - - - 2 0 0/0 - 67 VTY - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - 68 VTY - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - 69 VTY - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - 70 VTY - - - - - 0 0 0/0 - Line(s) not in async mode -or- with no hardware support: 1-32

Configuration

After figuring ouch which ports are going to go to which device we can start generating a configuration. First we’re going to configure our serial lines to allow us to connect to them via telnet, then configure the no exec option (While far from being mandatory, it will certainly help you from becoming locked out of a line). We’re also going to use exec-timeout 0 0 to prevent our sessions from disconnecting us when idle.

AS(config)#line 1 16 AS(config-line)#transport input telnet AS(config-line)#no exec AS(config-line)#exec-timeout 0 0

Now we can move on to our host configuration. In this case we’re going to use a loopback interface on the device to “talk” with.

AS(config)#interface lo0 AS(config-if)#ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.255 AS(config-if)#exit AS(config)#ip host r1 2001 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host r2 2002 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host r3 2003 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host r4 2004 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host r5 2005 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host r6 2006 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host sw1 2007 10.0.0.1 AS(config)#ip host sw2 2008 10.0.0.1
A complete, working example configuration.

 

AS#sh run Building configuration... Current configuration: ! version 12.0 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname AS ! ! ip subnet-zero ip host r1 2001 10.0.0.1 ip host r2 2002 10.0.0.1 ip host r3 2003 10.0.0.1 ip host r4 2004 10.0.0.1 ip host r5 2005 10.0.0.1 ip host r6 2006 10.0.0.1 ip host sw1 2007 10.0.0.1 ip host sw2 2008 10.0.0.1 ! ! ! interface Loopback0 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0 no ip directed-broadcast ! interface Ethernet0 ip address 192.168.88.23 255.255.255.0 no ip directed-broadcast shutdown ! interface Serial0 no ip address no ip directed-broadcast no ip mroute-cache shutdown ! ip classless ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.88.1 ! ! line con 0 transport input none line 1 16 no exec exec-timeout 0 0 transport input telnet line aux 0 line vty 0 4 login ! end

Using the Access Server

Now that we’ve got things up and running, lets go over some of the basics of using our access server. The first thing you need to know is how to connect to your devices, right? Well, simply type in the name of the host we configured and you’ll be connected to that line.

AS#r1 Trying r1 (10.0.0.1, 2001)... Open % Please answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:

To get back to your access server, use the Cisco escape sequence. Ctrl + Shift + 6 then X Now you’re able to clear that line. Use the command show sessions to see which lines are open, to clear them simply type clear line [line number]. ( You can also use the command disconnect [session number] to clear any open sessions. )

AS#show sessions Conn Host Address Byte Idle Conn Name * 1 r1 10.0.0.1 0 0 r1 AS#clear line 1 [confirm] [OK]

If you simply wish to switch back to that session, just type the connection number (at left) displayed in the show sessions output. ( Pressing enter on an empty line also resumes your most recent session. )

AS#show sessions Conn Host Address Byte Idle Conn Name * 1 r1 10.0.0.1 0 0 r1 AS#1 [Resuming connection 1 to r1 ... ]

Network engineer currently servicing the enterprise data center market. I started working on networks in the ’90s and still feel like that was just a few years ago. Jack of all trades, master of none; I love to learn about everything. Feel free to ask me about photography, woodworking, nhra, watches, or even networking! — For feedback, please leave a comment on the article in question, and I’ll gladly moderate it several weeks later. For everything else including fan mail or death threats, contact me via twitter.

Filed Under: ciscoTagged With: access server, asynchronous, lab, serial, terminal server


Overview of Cisco 2800 Series Routers


The Cisco 2800 series of integrated services routers offers secure, wire-speed delivery of concurrent data, voice, and video services. The modular design of the Cisco 2800 series routers provides maximum flexibility, allowing you to configure your router to meet evolving needs. The Cisco 2800 series routers incorporate data, security, and voice services in a single system for fast, scalable delivery of crucial business applications. The routers offer features such as hardware-based VPN encryption acceleration, intrusion-protection and firewall functions, and optional integrated call processing and voice mail. The routers offer a wide variety of network modules and interfaces, voice digital signal processor (DSP) slots, high-density interfaces for a wide range of connectivity requirements, and sufficient performance and slot density for future network expansion requirements and advanced applications.

The Cisco 2800 series consists of four versions. The Cisco 2801 routers and Cisco 2811 routers are one rack unit in height and have two 10/100 LAN ports. The more powerful Cisco 2821 routers and Cisco 2851 routers are two rack units in height and have two 10/100/1000 LAN ports. The higher-end router platforms of the Cisco 2800 series offer increased performance, increased slot density including network module slots ad extension voice module slots and increased inline power output.

Figure 1, Figure 2, and Figure 3 show front views of the Cisco 2800 series routers.

Figure 1 Front View of a Cisco 2801 Router

Figure 2 Front View of a Cisco 2811 Router

Figure 3 Front View of a Cisco 2821 or Cisco 2851 Router

This chapter describes the features and specifications of the routers and includes the following sections:

Hardware Features

Chassis Views

Interface Numbering

Specifications

Regulatory Compliance

Hardware Features

This section describes the basic features of Cisco 2800 series routers, including product identification, built-in interfaces, modules, memory, LED indicators, chassis ventilation, and the internal clock.

Product Serial Number Location

The serial number label for Cisco 2801 routers is located on the rear of the chassis, along the bottom edge near the lower left corner. (See Figure 4.)

Figure 4 Serial Number Location on the Cisco 2801 Router


Note The serial number for Cisco 2801 routers is 11 characters long.


The serial number label for Cisco 2811 routers is located on the rear of the chassis, near the top right corner, to the left of the CLEI label. (See Figure 5.)

Figure 5 Serial Number Location on the Cisco 2811 Router


Note The serial number for Cisco 2811 routers is 11 characters long.


The serial number label for Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 routers is located on the rear of the chassis, near the top right corner, below the CLEI label. (See Figure 6.)

Figure 6 Serial Number Location on the Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 Routers


Note The serial number for Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 routers is 11 characters long.


Cisco Product Identification Tool

The Cisco Product Identification (CPI) tool provides detailed illustrations and descriptions showing where to locate serial number labels on Cisco products. It includes the following features:

A search option that allows browsing for models using a tree-structured product hierarchy

A search field on the final results page making it easier to look up multiple products

End-of-sale products are clearly identified in results lists

The tool streamlines the process of locating serial number labels and identifying products. Serial number information expedites the entitlement process and is important for access to support services.

The Cisco Product Identification tool can be accessed at the following URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/Support/CPI/index.do

Built-in Interfaces

Table 1 summarizes the interface ports built into the chassis.

Model 100BASE-T Fast Ethernet (FE) Ports (RJ-45) 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet (GE) Ports (RJ-45) Universal Serial Bus (USB) Ports Console Port (RJ-45) Auxiliary Port (RJ-45)

Cisco 2801

2

1

1

1

Cisco 2811

2

2

1

1

Cisco 2821

2

2

1

1

Cisco 2851

2

2

1

1


Removable and Interchangeable Modules

Table 2 summarizes the optional modules that can be installed in the router to provide specific capabilities. The network modules, extension voice modules, and interface cards fit into slots, located on the front of the chassis on the Cisco 2801 router, and on the rear of the chassis on the Cisco 2811, Cisco 2821, and Cisco 2851 routers; they can be removed and installed without opening the chassis. Advanced integration modules (AIMs), expansion DRAM memory modules (DIMMs), and packet voice data modules (PVDMs) plug into connectors inside the chassis; they can be removed and installed only by opening the chassis.

Router Model External Modules (In chassis slots) Internal Modules
Network Modules High-Speed WAN Interface Cards (HWICs) Extension Voice Modules (EVMs) Advanced Integration Modules (AIMs) Packet Voice Data Modules (PVDMs) 1

Cisco 2801

2 single-wide (HWIC) or
2 double-wide (HWIC-D)

1 WIC/VWIC/VIC slot

1 VWIC/VIC (voice-only)

2

2

Cisco 2811

1 network module (NM) or

1 network module enhanced (NME)

4 single-wide (HWIC) or

2 double-wide (HWIC-D)

2

2

Cisco 2821

1 network module (NM) or

1 network module enhanced (NME) or

1 network module enhanced extended (NME-X)

4 single-wide (HWIC) or

2 double-wide (HWIC-D)

1

2

3

Cisco 2851

1 network module (NM) or

1 network module enhanced (NME) or

1 network module enhanced extended (NME-X) or

1 network module double-wide (NMD) or

1 network module enhanced extended double-wide (NME-XD)

4 single-wide (HWIC) or

2 double-wide (HWIC-D)

1

2

3


Memory

Cisco 2800 series routers contain the following types of memory:

DRAM—Stores the running configuration and routing tables and is used for packet buffering by the network interfaces. Cisco IOS software executes from DRAM memory.

Boot/NVRAM—Internal flash memory. Stores the bootstrap program (ROM monitor), the configuration register, and the startup configuration.

Flash memory—External flash memory. Stores the operating system software image.

Table 3 summarizes the memory options for Cisco 2800 series routers. The default memory numbers for RAM represent the minimum usable memory. You can install additional RAM in multiples of the default amount, up to the maximum amount.

Router Platform DRAM Boot/NVRAM Flash Memory

Cisco 2801

Type—SDRAM DIMM

DIMM sizes—64 MB, 128 MB, 256 MB

DIMM expansion slots—11

Default onboard memory—128 MB

Maximum memory—384 MB

Internal 4-MB flash memory

External CompactFlash memory cards of the following optional sizes:

64 MB (default)

128 MB

Cisco 2811

Type—ECC DDR (error-correcting code, double data rate) SDRAM DIMM

DIMM sizes—256 MB, 512 MB

DIMM slots—2

Default onboard memory— none

Default memory—256 MB

Maximum memory—768 MB2

Internal 2-MB flash memory

External CompactFlash memory cards of the following optional sizes:

64 MB (default)

128 MB

256 MB

Cisco 2821

Type—ECC DDR (error-correcting code, double data rate) DRAM DIMM

DIMM sizes—256 MB, 512 MB

DIMM slots—2

Default onboard memory— none

Default memory—256 MB

Maximum memory—1024 MB3

Cisco 2851


Power

Table 4 summarizes the power options for Cisco 2800 series routers. Cisco 2801 routers are equipped for operation using AC power only. Cisco 2811, Cisco 2821, and Cisco 2851 routers can be equipped for operation using either AC or DC input power by installation of the appropriate chassis power supply. IP phone power is supported if the appropriate AC-input chassis power supply is installed.

Router Model Power Option Input IP Phone Power Output

Cisco 2801

AC input without IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 2 A

None

AC input with IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 5 A

-48 VDC, 120 W

Cisco 2811

AC input without IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 2 A

None

AC input with IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 4 A

-48 VDC, 160 W

DC input without IP phone power output

24 - 60 VDC, 8 A

None

Cisco 2821

AC input without IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 3 A

None

AC input with IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 8 A

-48 VDC, 240 W

DC input without IP phone power output

24 - 60 VDC, 12 A

None

Cisco 2851

AC input without IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 3 A

None

AC input with IP phone power output

100 - 240 VAC, 8 A

-48 VDC, 360 W

DC input without IP phone power output

24 - 60 VDC, 12 A

None

Cisco 2811, Cisco 2821, and Cisco 2851

Backup power for AC- or DC-powered routers:

Cisco Redundant Power System (RPS-675)

100 VAC, 10 A,
or 240 VAC, 6 A

The Cisco RPS provides IP phone power only if the chassis power supply supports IP phone power.

With Cisco 2811: -48 VDC, 160 W

With Cisco 2821: -48 VDC, 240 W

With Cisco 2851: -48 VDC, 360 W


LED Indicators

Table 5 and Table 6 summarize the LED indicators that are located in the router bezel or chassis, but not in removable modules or interface cards.

To see descriptions of LEDs in removable modules and interface cards, refer to the applicable documentation for those products: the Cisco Network Modules Hardware Installation Guide or the Cisco Interface Cards Installation Guide.

For LED troubleshooting information, including possible trouble causes and corrective actions, see Table 1 in the "Troubleshooting Cisco 2800 Series Routers" document.

LED Color Description Location

SYS PWR

Green

Router has successfully booted up and the
software is functional. This LED blinks while
booting or in the ROM monitor.

Front

SYS ACT

Green

Blinking when any packets are transmitted or received on any WAN or LAN or system is monitoring internal activities.

Front

CF

Green

On when flash memory is busy. Do not
remove the CompactFlash memory card when this light is on.

Front

AUX/PWR

Green/
Amber

Indicates that the inline power supply is present
(LED is on). When the inline power supply is not
installed, the LED is off. If the power supply is
working properly, the LED is green. If the
power supply is not working properly, the LED
is amber, indicating an inline power failure.

Front

FE 0 Link

Green

On when the router is correctly connected to a
local Ethernet LAN through Ethernet port 0.

Front

FE 0 100

Green

On indicates a 100-Mbps link.
Off indicates a 10-Mbps link.

Front

FE 0 FDX

Green

On indicates full-duplex operation.
Off indicates half-duplex operation.

Front

FE 1 Link

Green

On when the router is correctly connected to a
local Ethernet LAN through Ethernet port 1.

Front

FE 1 100

Green

On indicates a 100-Mbps link.
Off indicates a 10-Mbps link.

Front

FE 1 FDX

Green

On indicates full-duplex operation.
Off indicates half-duplex operation.

Front

AIM 0

Green

On indicates presence of an advanced integration
module (AIM) in AIM slot 0.

Front

AIM 1

Green

On indicates presence of an AIM in AIM slot 1.

Front

PVDM 0

Green

On indicates presence of a packet voice data
module (PVDM) in PVDM slot 0.

Front

PVDM 1

Green

On indicates presence of a PVDM in PVDM slot 1.

Front


LED Location LED Label LED Color or State Meaning

Front of chassis

SYS
PWR

Solid green

System is operating normally

Blinking green

System is booting or is in ROM monitor mode

Amber

System error

Off

Power is off or system board is faulty

AUX/
PWR

Green

IP phone power operating normally (if installed), or

Cisco Redundant Power System (RPS) operating normally (if installed)

Amber

IP phone power fault (if installed), or

Cisco Redundant Power System (RPS) fault (if installed)

Off

IP phone power and Cisco RPS are not installed

SYS
ACT

Blinking green or solid green

Packet transfers are occurring

Off

No packet transfers are occurring

CF

Green

Flash memory is being accessed; do not eject the CompactFlash memory card

Off

Flash memory is not being accessed; okay to eject the CompactFlash memory card

Rear of chassis

A (=ACT)

Blinking green or solid green

Packet activity in FE or GE port

Off

No packet activity in FE or GE port

F (=FDX)

Green

FE or GE port is operating in full-duplex mode

Off

FE or GE port is operating in half-duplex mode

S (= Speed)1

1 blink + pause

FE or GE port operating at 10 Mbps

2 blinks + pause

FE or GE port operating at 100 Mbps

3 blinks + pause

GE port operating at 1000 Mbps (Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 only)

L (= Link)

Green

FE or GE link is established

Off

No FE or GE link is established

PVDM0

PVDM1

PVDM22

Green

PVDM in slot (0, 1, or 2) is initialized

Amber

PVDM in slot (0, 1, or 2) is detected but not initialized

Off

No PVDM installed in slot (0, 1, or 2)

AIM0

AIM1

Green

AIM in slot (0 or 1) is initialized

Amber

AIM in slot (0 or 1) has initialization error

Off

No AIM installed in slot (0 or 1)


Chassis Ventilation

Internal multispeed fans provide chassis cooling, controlled by an onboard temperature sensor.

The Cisco 2801 router has two fans. The Cisco 2801 router with inline power includes two additional fans integrated with the inline power supply, for a total of four fans. The Cisco 2801 internal fans operate at three different speeds, running at the slower speeds to conserve power and reduce fan noise at ambient temperatures below 40oC. They operate at the highest speed in ambient temperatures above 40oC.

The Cisco 2811 router has three fans that operate at a slower speed to conserve power and reduce fan noise at ambient temperatures below 32oC. They operate at high speed in ambient temperatures above 32oC.

The Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 routers have three fans that operate at a slower speed to conserve power and reduce fan noise at ambient temperatures below 40oC. They operate at high speed in ambient temperatures above 40oC.


Caution Ensure the device is not installed in close proximity to other devices which could lead to excessive pre-heating of air at the air intake of the router.

Caution Your chassis installation must allow unrestricted airflow for chassis cooling.

Cisco 2800 Series Router Installation and Preventive Maintenance

Periodic inspection and cleaning of the external surface of the router is recommended to minimize the negative impact of environmental dust or debris on the router performance. The frequency of inspection and cleaning is dependent upon the severity of the environmental conditions. Cleaning involves vacuuming of router air intake and exhaust vents.


Caution Fans are dynamic Electro-Mechanical devices. As such, fans can fail for various electronic reasons, and will eventually fail due to mechanical wear-out. Sites with ambient temperatures consistently above 25 degree C and with potentially high levels of dust or debris may require fan servicing.

Real-Time Clock

An internal real-time clock with battery backup provides the system software with time of day on system power up. This allows the system to verify the validity of the certification authority (CA) certificate. In the Cisco 2811, Cisco 2821, and Cisco 2851 routers, the clock and battery are permanently installed; the battery lasts the life of the router under the operating environmental conditions specified for the router. The Cisco 2801 router has a socketed lithium battery. This battery lasts the life of the router under the operating environmental conditions specified for the router, and is not field-replaceable.


Note If the lithium battery in a Cisco 2801 router should fail, the router must be returned to Cisco for repair.


Although the battery is not intended to be field-replaceable, the following warning must be heeded:


Warning There is the danger of explosion if the battery is replaced incorrectly. Replace the battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer's instructions. Statement 1015

Chassis Views

This section contains views of the front and rear panels of the Cisco 2800 series routers, showing locations of the power and signal interfaces, module slots, status indicators, and chassis identification labels.

Cisco 2801 Chassis

Figure 7 shows the front panel of a Cisco 2801 router. Figure 8 shows the back panel.

Figure 7 Front Panel of the Cisco 2801 Router

1

Slot 0 (VIC or VWIC, for voice only)

8

Auxiliary Power (AUX/PWR) LED

2

Slot 1 (WIC, VIC, VWIC, or HWIC)

9

Universal serial bus (USB) port

3

Slot 2 (WIC, VIC, or VWIC)

10

AIM/PVDM LEDs

4

Slot 3 (WIC, VIC, VWIC, or HWIC)

11

Auxiliary port

5

Console port

12

Compact flash (CF) LED

6

Fast Ethernet ports and LEDs

13

External CompactFlash memory card slot

7

System LEDs

14

Removable center card guides to allow double-wide HWIC-D installation


Double-wide HWICs can go into slots 0 and 1, and into slots 2 and 3.


Note Slot 0 does not support PRI on T1/E1 VWICs, only channel-associated signaling (CAS) digital voice.


Figure 8 Back Panel of the Cisco 2801 Router

1

Input power connector

3

Chassis ground connection

2

On/Off switch

  

Cisco 2811 Chassis

Figure 9, Figure 10, and Figure 11 show the front panel of a Cisco 2811 router. Figure 12 shows the rear panel of a Cisco 2811 router.

Figure 9 Front Panel of Cisco 2811 Router with AC Input Power and Without IP Phone Power Output

1

Input power connection

5

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

2

On/Off switch

6

External CompactFlash memory card slot

3

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

7

LED indicators

4

Console and auxiliary ports

  

Figure 10 Front Panel of Cisco 2811 Router with AC Input Power and with IP Phone Power Output

1

Input power connection

5

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

2

On/Off switch

6

External CompactFlash memory card slot

3

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

7

LED indicators

4

Console and auxiliary ports

  

Figure 11 Front Panel of Cisco 2811 Router with DC Input Power

1

Input power connection

5

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

2

On/Stand-by switch1

6

External CompactFlash memory card slot

3

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

7

LED indicators

4

Console and auxiliary ports

  

Figure 12 Rear Panel of Cisco 2811 Router

1

Screw holes for ground lug

5

High-speed WAN interface card slot 1

2

Fast Ethernet port 0/0

6

High-speed WAN interface card slot 2

3

Fast Ethernet port 0/1

7

High-speed WAN interface card slot 3

4

High-speed WAN interface card slot 0

8

Network module enhanced (NME) slot1


Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 Chassis

Figure 13, Figure 14, and Figure 15 show the front panel of Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 routers. Figure 16 shows the rear panel of a Cisco 2821 router. Figure 17 shows the rear panel of a Cisco 2851 router.

Figure 13 Front Panel of Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 Routers with AC Input Power and Without IP Phone Power Output

1

Input power connection

5

External CompactFlash memory card slot

2

On/Off switch

6

LED indicators

3

Console and auxiliary ports

7

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

4

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

  

Figure 14 Front Panel of Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 Routers with AC Input Power and IP Phone Power Output

1

Input power connection

5

External CompactFlash memory card slot

2

On/Off switch

6

LED indicators

3

Console and auxiliary ports

7

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

4

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

  

Figure 15 Front Panel of Cisco 2821 and Cisco 2851 Routers with DC Input Power

1

Input power connection

5

External CompactFlash memory card slot

2

On/Standby switch1

6

LED indicators

3

Console and auxiliary ports

7

Cisco redundant power supply connector (covered if not used)

4

Universal serial bus (USB) ports

  

Figure 16 Rear Panel of the Cisco 2821 Router

1

Gigabit Ethernet port 0/0

6

High-speed WAN interface card slot 3

2

Gigabit Ethernet port 0/1

7

Extension voice module (EVM) slot

3

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